Runosong (regilaul) in Lääne-Virumaa

Kadrina Kadrid. Photo: Avo Seidelberg Throughout the course of 19th and 21st centuries regilaul (archaic Estonian singing tradition), which used to be an integral and self-evident part of the daily life of Estonians, became a consciously practised cultural expression. The bearer and shaper of the regilaul tradition is no longer a peasant, but rather rural intelligentsia. A modern audience values first and foremost the aesthetic and cultural-historical meaning of regilaul, not so much its earlier functional or mythological content. The revival of runosong in Lääne-Viru County has been directly linked to the activities of Lahemaa National Park since the second part of the 20th century. The international folklore festival Viru Säru (1986-2008) also contributed to this revival. As a result, several folk groups were formed in the Lääne-Viru region that still continue to practice the regilaul culture. Such folk groups include Lahemaa Rahwamuusikud (1975), Tink-Tingadi (1995) and Kadrina Kadrid (2002). As their repertoire is solely local, their activities help to safeguard and to develop local cultural identity. For the members of the folk groups and their families, regilaul forms a natural part of their daily life.

Runosong (regilaul) in Lääne-Virumaa

This entry to the inventory was compiled by Igor Tõnurist and Pilvi Lepiksoo

Runosong (regilaul) in Lääne-Virumaa
Kadrina Kadrid. Photo: Avo Seidelberg
Throughout the course of 19th and 21st centuries regilaul (archaic Estonian singing tradition), which used to be an integral and self-evident part of the daily life of Estonians, became a consciously practised cultural expression. The bearer and shaper of the regilaul tradition is no longer a peasant, but rather rural intelligentsia. A modern audience values first and foremost the aesthetic and cultural-historical meaning of regilaul, not so much its earlier functional or mythological content.
 

The revival of runosong in Lääne-Viru County has been directly linked to the activities of Lahemaa National Park since the second part of the 20th century. The international folklore festival Viru Säru (1986-2008) also contributed to this revival. As a result, several folk groups were formed in the Lääne-Viru region that still continue to practice the regilaul culture. Such folk groups include Lahemaa Rahwamuusikud (1975), Tink-Tingadi (1995) and Kadrina Kadrid (2002). As their repertoire is solely local, their activities help to safeguard and to develop local cultural identity. For the members of the folk groups and their families, regilaul forms a natural part of their daily life.

Viimati uuendatud 21. aprillil 2015
Runosong (regilaul) in Lääne-Virumaa
December 2017
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Kadrina Kadrid. Photo: Avo Seidelberg Throughout the course of 19th and 21st centuries regilaul (archaic Estonian singing tradition), which used to be an integral and self-evident part of the daily life of Estonians, became a consciously practised cultural expression. The bearer and shaper of the regilaul tradition is no longer a peasant, but rather rural intelligentsia. A modern audience values first and foremost the aesthetic and cultural-historical meaning of regilaul, not so much its earlier functional or mythological content. The revival of runosong in Lääne-Viru County has been directly linked to the activities of Lahemaa National Park since the second part of the 20th century. The international folklore festival Viru Säru (1986-2008) also contributed to this revival. As a result, several folk groups were formed in the Lääne-Viru region that still continue to practice the regilaul culture. Such folk groups include Lahemaa Rahwamuusikud (1975), Tink-Tingadi (1995) and Kadrina Kadrid (2002). As their repertoire is solely local, their activities help to safeguard and to develop local cultural identity. For the members of the folk groups and their families, regilaul forms a natural part of their daily life.

This entry to the inventory was compiled by Igor Tõnurist and Pilvi Lepiksoo Runosong (regilaul) in Lääne-Virumaa

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