School of Storytelling

Ms Piret Päär Oral Heritage Specialist, professional storyteller pire[no-Smpam)t. paar@rahvakultuur.ee +372 51 40 242 ABOUT STORYTELLING IN ESTONIA Throughout history, storytelling has helped people to connect themselves with the surrounding world and community. The experiences, knowledge and value judgements necessary for survival are related through stories. Opportunities for storytelling were provided by joint work and pastimes, amusements, long hikes and journeys and military service. It was believed that storytelling influenced the successfulness of hunting, fishing, herding and farming. The long, dark autumn-winter period was considered the most suitable time for telling stories in Estonia. Time was found for recreational storytelling year-round. The time of large families and joint work and other activities has gradually come to an end. The company of television, radio or the press are preferred to togetherness and conversation. In village society the recounting of stories was the inevitable result of social interaction. In today's increasingly individual-centered society, storytelling may help us better to understand ourselves - who we are and who we could be. In the contemporary mass-entertainment-oriented cultural scene, it is necessary once again to make people aware of the importance of the storytelling tradition and the need t

School of Storytelling

School of Storytelling

Ms Piret Päär
Oral Heritage Specialist, professional storyteller

+372 51 40 242

ABOUT STORYTELLING IN ESTONIA

Throughout history, storytelling has helped people to connect themselves with the surrounding world and community. The experiences, knowledge and value judgements necessary for survival are related through stories. Opportunities for storytelling were provided by joint work and pastimes, amusements, long hikes and journeys and military service. It was believed that storytelling influenced the successfulness of hunting, fishing, herding and farming. The long, dark autumn-winter period was considered the most suitable time for telling stories in Estonia. Time was found for recreational storytelling year-round.

 

The time of large families and joint work and other activities has gradually come to an end. The company of television, radio or the press are preferred to togetherness and conversation. In village society the recounting of stories was the inevitable result of social interaction. In today's increasingly individual-centered society, storytelling may help us better to understand ourselves - who we are and who we could be. In the contemporary mass-entertainment-oriented cultural scene, it is necessary once again to make people aware of the importance of the storytelling tradition and the need to tell and share stories. Through stories we reflect our ideas, emotions, behaviour, value judgements and identity. In addition to the loss of traditional story material, there is a great danger that mankind is losing its biographical means of expression, images of life and overall picture of life.

 

Pictures are received in ready form from television, although that is merely a passive series of alien pictures. By telling our own stories, we can offer someone else experiences, knowledge and also spiritual support. Listening to others' stories helps one to revive pictures that one has been unable either to remember or arrange.

Today we have other opportunities for telling stories.


Storytelling courses have been regularly organised since 1991 at the Estonian Folk Culture Centre. The most extensive of these is the School of Fairy Tales. The purpose of the storytelling courses and seminars is to entice adults back to storytelling. Kindergarten teachers, schoolteachers, librarians, etc. all indeed often use fairy tales in their everyday work, but the share of other tradition is receding. It is necessary that consciousness be raised concerning the meaning of family tradition, stories connected with one's hometown and people, etc. Even the repertoire of fairy tales often tends to be restricted to familiar and known classics. We have attempted to demonstrate the different possibilities for approaching fairy tales and have offered methods for domesticating even the most alien of tales.

 

In addition to teaching, the School of Fairy tales is also involved with the general advancement of the storytelling movement in Estonia.We have told stories at folklore events, community centres, museums, kindergartens and schools - to both children and adults. We have transcribed texts from the collections of the Estonian Folklore Archives and attempted to take them back to the same places from where they were once gathered. Frequent and close co-operation has developed with folk musicians, the purpose of which is not just a concert experience in which stories are told between music and singing. Our desire at such gatherings is to encourage the listeners to notice, listen and tell stories, if not at that same moment and in that same room, then at home, among friends, etc. 

Viimati uuendatud 13. mail 2015
School of Storytelling
June 2017
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Kodulehe valmistamine aara.ee

Ms Piret Päär Oral Heritage Specialist, professional storyteller pire[no-Smpam)t. paar@rahvakultuur.ee +372 51 40 242 ABOUT STORYTELLING IN ESTONIA Throughout history, storytelling has helped people to connect themselves with the surrounding world and community. The experiences, knowledge and value judgements necessary for survival are related through stories. Opportunities for storytelling were provided by joint work and pastimes, amusements, long hikes and journeys and military service. It was believed that storytelling influenced the successfulness of hunting, fishing, herding and farming. The long, dark autumn-winter period was considered the most suitable time for telling stories in Estonia. Time was found for recreational storytelling year-round. The time of large families and joint work and other activities has gradually come to an end. The company of television, radio or the press are preferred to togetherness and conversation. In village society the recounting of stories was the inevitable result of social interaction. In today's increasingly individual-centered society, storytelling may help us better to understand ourselves - who we are and who we could be. In the contemporary mass-entertainment-oriented cultural scene, it is necessary once again to make people aware of the importance of the storytelling tradition and the need to tell and share stories. Through stories we reflect our ideas, emotions, behaviour, value judgements and identity. In addition to the loss of traditional story material, there is a great danger that mankind is losing its biographical means of expression, images of life and overall picture of life. Pictures are received in ready form from television, although that is merely a passive series of alien pictures. By telling our own stories, we can offer someone else experiences, knowledge and also spiritual support. Listening to others' storating even the most alien of tales.   In addition to teaching, the School of Fairy tales is also involved with the general advancement of the storytelling movement in Estonia. We have told stories at folklore events, community centres, museums, kindergartens and schools - to both children and adults. We have transcribed texts from the collections of the Estonian Folklore Archives and attempted to take them back to the same places from where they were once gathered. Frequent and close co-operation has developed with folk musicians, the purpose of which is not just a concert experience in which stories are told between music and singing. Our desire at such gatherings is to encourage the listeners to notice, listen and tell stories, if not at that same moment and in that same room, then at home, among friends, etc.  

School of Storytelling

Rahvakultuuri Keskus  | J.Vilmsi 55, Tallinn 10147 | +372 600 9291 |